Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Java’

IBM to buyout Sun Microsystems?

March 19, 2009 5 comments

This story paints a gloomy outlook for Sun Microsystems. This purchase would certainly end the “wars” between IBM and Sun over Java… One has to wonder what it would mean for the future of Java (the language, the platform, everything). At least HotSpot and the class library are open source now.

My understanding is that Microsoft are cashed up in this economic crisis. Plus they’ve even hired Neal Gafter. Microsoft hire a lot of very good guys. With Gafter over at Microsoft, I wonder if that influenced the decision to squash closures for Java… That was the dumbest move for Java. I suppose it doesn’t really matter: for me, Scala is the next Java.

I wonder if businesses will be more likely to adopt .NET rather than Java now though and really turn the tide. This global recession is turning out to be what I call The Greater Depression, some The Second Great Depression and still some other young ‘uns The Great Depression 2.0. I wonder who will come out on top? With ReSharper, Visual Studio is actually pretty good! So, no excuses – go brush up those C# skills! 😉

Advertisements

WebBeans => Java Contexts and Dependency Injection

January 29, 2009 2 comments

I’ve been watching the WebBeans/JSR-299 specification for quite some time. After some discussion on the webbeans mailing list, the name was recently changed to Java Contexts and Dependency Injection. This removes the “dependency” on “Web” part. Since it’s effectively a new component model for Java, it didn’t make sense to restrict it to Web environments. The new name is long and not as catchy … maybe it’ll become known as JCDI.

An updated public draft is now available. Other useful information – particularly the introductory guide – can be found on the Seam Framework wiki.

The specification draws much from Seam and Guice and consequently Gavin King and Bob Lee. Congratulations to all involved in the specification. It’s really worth looking at particularly if you haven’t been using Seam 2 or Guice 2. I find myself particularly drawn to Guice 2. I hope they release it soon :).

Ext JS 2.1 now GPL :(

April 22, 2008 Leave a comment

Unfortunately Ext JS 2.1 (and Ext GWT 1.0) have been released under the GPL. This will make Ext more difficult to sell to corporate clients.

Ext JS 2.0.2 is still available for download under a LGPL licence and can be used with the GWT integration found in the GWT-Ext project (not to be confused with Ext GWT). i.e. GWT-Ext 2.0.3 and Ext 2.0.2 are still both LGPL. I wonder if Ext GWT 1.0 (GPL) started life as GWT-Ext 2.0.3 (LGPL)…

I wonder if a fork will appear… or perhaps a Yahoo! UI on GWT or a Tibco GI on GWT. Both YUI and GI are BSD and so very business friendly.

I discovered a promise of a tibcogi4gwt project but nothing more 😦

Update: more info can be found in a post by the author of GWT-Ext.

Java Puzzlers

August 24, 2007 Leave a comment

Go directly to here if you think you know all the dark corners of the Java language and APIs. It’s a really worthwhile Google TechTalk. You will come away thinking that you had better set up automated FindBugs analysis of your code!

More praise for Wicket

Wicket has finally graduated to become a top level Apache project and is receiving a much praise as ever.

Categories: Programming Tags: , ,

Exceptions – checked or not?

The Java Posse #127 podcast talks about the possibility of removing checked exceptions from the Java language. The JavaPosse folks seem to universally like them. No one knew what Scala did with respect to checked exceptions. Turns out that it does not have them!

3.3. Why are there no throws annotations on methods, unlike in Java?

Compile-time checking of exceptions sounds good in theory, but in practice has not worked well. Programmers tend to write catch clauses that catch too many exceptions, thus swallowing exceptions and decreasing reliability.

If you haven’t seen the Scala language yet, check Martin Odersky’s Google Techtalk.

I tend to avoid checked exceptions. This is the way that the Spring folks have gone and – of course – Anders Hejlsberg. Anders did a great job designing the C# language.

I’m still digging into an article on dev2dev which promotes checked exceptions and points out that that the times they get annoying is where the Java API was poorly designed. For me this still points that checked exceptions are a experimental language feature perhaps best left out of industry programming languages for now.

Closures for Java

Just watched Neal Gafter’s Google tech talk about closures again. I really hope that the community gets behind this proposal. Let’s do it right rather than opting for any “pragmatic” solution that amount to a concise syntax for anonymous classes. Gafter’s proposed will allow the “language” to change between updates to the Java Language Specification. This will allow more experimentation and innovation. I encourage you to watch the video for the details. Additional information can be gleaned from the JavaPolis interview.

There has appeared a consensus proposal on the javac.info site. It does appear that Bob Lee (Crazy Bob) has been turned around. I hope the consensus is not a compromise on the original proposal’s intent.